KamKam
Catcalls make us feel unsafe. Catcalls remind us that, at any moment, even when we feel safe, we could be assaulted. Even if we were all superwomen, capable of dodging all harm, catcalls tell us that we’re only objects, waiting to be objectified by the next brazen creep who walks by.
Valerie Burn (via mysharona1987)

may10baby:

Now, both of these guys are war vets, and one guy is talking about how he went to his daughter’s fashion design show at her college and he saw a pretty little model dressed up and walking around. He walks over and starts flirting with her, asking her what she models for and everything.

She’s like…

womensenews:

On August 26th, we commemorate the 1920 passage of the 19th Amendment to the Constitution of the United States, granting women the right to vote. The observance of Women’s Equality Day not only celebrates the passage of the Amendment, but also calls attention to women’s continuing efforts toward full equality.
That’s what we do every day. We work with reporters all over the world to amplify women’s stories and shape international understanding of barriers to equality for ALL women. 
So, this U.S. Women’s Equality Day, for the price of a latte or a cup of tea, donate to Women’s eNews and provide women around the world a platform to be heard. 

womensenews:

On August 26th, we commemorate the 1920 passage of the 19th Amendment to the Constitution of the United States, granting women the right to vote. The observance of Women’s Equality Day not only celebrates the passage of the Amendment, but also calls attention to women’s continuing efforts toward full equality.

That’s what we do every day. We work with reporters all over the world to amplify women’s stories and shape international understanding of barriers to equality for ALL women. 

So, this U.S. Women’s Equality Day, for the price of a latte or a cup of tea, donate to Women’s eNews and provide women around the world a platform to be heard

52 Powerful Photos of Women who changed history forever

ceptinamerica:

Kathrine Switzer becomes the first woman to run the Boston Marathon, despite attempts by the marathon organizer to stop her. [1967]

Sabiha Gökçen of Turkey poses with her plane, in 1937 she became the first female fighter pilot.

Two women show uncovered legs in public for the first time in Toronto. [1937]

A woman suffrage activist protesting after “The Night of Terror.” [1917]

more here

What does it say about our culture when games routinely bend or break the laws of physics and no one bats an eye; when dragons, ogres and magic are inserted into historically influenced settings without objection; we’re perfectly willing to suspend our disbelief when it comes to multiple lives, super powers, health regeneration and the ability to carry dozens of weapons in a massive invisible backpack. But, somehow, the idea of a world without sexual violance and exploitation is deemed too strange and too bizarre to be believable.
kosmik-kiko:

An Egyptian feminist and blogger is taking to social media to protest the strict nature of Islam and, according to her, a “society which promotes violence, racism, sexism, harassment and hypocrisy.”
Aliaa Magda Elmahdy, 23, and a veiled woman is seen in this picture pooping and bleeding on a black ISIS flag. Although Elmahdy did not explain why she took this particular photo, she takes a strong stance against Islamic and Sharia Laws. The Arab nations apparently did not print the photo because on the flag is written “there is no God but Allah.”
After ISIS slaughtered their way across major cities in the Middle East and have taken control of 1/3 Iraq, women there have become the target of their increasingly strict rules. The jihadists mandated that women cannot leave the house without a male relative, must wear full veils, and in the northern city of Mosul, all women and girls are being forced to undergo female genital mutilation.
This isn’t the first time that Elmahdy has caused outrage, even among liberal Muslims. In 2011, she posted nude photos on her Facebook page, claiming the photos “scream against a society of violence, racism, sexism, sexual harassment and hypocrisy.”
Secularist Sayyed el-Qimni, an opponent of Islamic fundamentalism that supports separation of religion and state, said:

““This hurts the entire secular current in front of those calling themselves the people of virtue. It is a double disaster. Because I am liberal and I believe in the right of personal freedom, I can’t interfere.”

I commend these women for their bravery. If you look past the vulgarity, this is probably one of the worst insults that a can be given in the Muslim world. Try to appreciate the courage and the message because these woman obviously have more guts than most men in the Middle East by standing up to ISIS like this, knowing there will be a huge target on their heads.
Although the way they chose to get their message out might seem a little extreme and even immoral, risking their lives in order to speak out against a sick religion that promotes such horrendous treatment towards women is in my opinion, heroic.
(source)

kosmik-kiko:

An Egyptian feminist and blogger is taking to social media to protest the strict nature of Islam and, according to her, a “society which promotes violence, racism, sexism, harassment and hypocrisy.”

Aliaa Magda Elmahdy, 23, and a veiled woman is seen in this picture pooping and bleeding on a black ISIS flag. Although Elmahdy did not explain why she took this particular photo, she takes a strong stance against Islamic and Sharia Laws. The Arab nations apparently did not print the photo because on the flag is written “there is no God but Allah.”

After ISIS slaughtered their way across major cities in the Middle East and have taken control of 1/3 Iraq, women there have become the target of their increasingly strict rules. The jihadists mandated that women cannot leave the house without a male relative, must wear full veils, and in the northern city of Mosul, all women and girls are being forced to undergo female genital mutilation.

This isn’t the first time that Elmahdy has caused outrage, even among liberal Muslims. In 2011, she posted nude photos on her Facebook page, claiming the photos “scream against a society of violence, racism, sexism, sexual harassment and hypocrisy.”

Secularist Sayyed el-Qimni, an opponent of Islamic fundamentalism that supports separation of religion and state, said:

““This hurts the entire secular current in front of those calling themselves the people of virtue. It is a double disaster. Because I am liberal and I believe in the right of personal freedom, I can’t interfere.”

I commend these women for their bravery. If you look past the vulgarity, this is probably one of the worst insults that a can be given in the Muslim world. Try to appreciate the courage and the message because these woman obviously have more guts than most men in the Middle East by standing up to ISIS like this, knowing there will be a huge target on their heads.

Although the way they chose to get their message out might seem a little extreme and even immoral, risking their lives in order to speak out against a sick religion that promotes such horrendous treatment towards women is in my opinion, heroic.

(source)

spencersarcastic:

⋙We teach girls that they cannot be sexual beings in the way that boys are. We teach girls to shrink themselves, to make themselves smaller. We say to girls, “You can have ambition, but not too much. You should aim to be successful but not too successful, otherwise you will threaten the man.” 
 FEMINIST: The person who believes in the social, political, and economic equality of the sexes.

spencersarcastic:

We teach girls that they cannot be sexual beings in the way that boys are. We teach girls to shrink themselves, to make themselves smaller. We say to girls, “You can have ambition, but not too much. You should aim to be successful but not too successful, otherwise you will threaten the man.”

FEMINIST: The person who believes in the social, political, and economic equality of the sexes.

Truly powerful people don’t explain why they want respect. They simply don’t engage someone who doesn’t give it to them.
Sherry Argov (via insanity-and-vanity)
Maybe we’ll all “lighten up” a bit when women are permitted to be successful without having to be literally on display for the male gaze while the real, full humans get to talk about serious, important things.
feminspire:

“Attention television writers: being offensive is not satire. Joking about things you’re doing wrong that results in people laughing with you and not at you is not helping. That is not change.”
Read: Hey Emmy’s! Your Blatant Sexism Wasn’t Hilarious Satire, Just SEXIST

feminspire:

Attention television writers: being offensive is not satire. Joking about things you’re doing wrong that results in people laughing with you and not at you is not helping. That is not change.”

Read: Hey Emmy’s! Your Blatant Sexism Wasn’t Hilarious Satire, Just SEXIST

I am not an empire you were ‘chosen’ to
conquer. My body is a fortress time built
with its own two hands and you were
never given permission to breath that
structure. A warrior such as myself
wasn’t born to fight for someone like you,
and my armor was crafted to be
impenetrable when facing your slurs on
the street. I could have lions guarding my
castle’s gates but my own roar is far more
ferocious.
You think you own me?
I’d love to see you prove it.
a note to the boy who tried to claim me // Haley Hendrick (via s-k-e-t-c-h-e-d)

Nicki Minaj is not a woman who easily slides into the roles assigned to women in her industry or elsewhere. She’s not polished, she’s not concerned with her reputation, and she’s certainly not fighting for equality among mainstream second-wave feminists. She’s something else, and she’s something equally worth giving credence to: a boundary-breaker, a nasty bitch, a self-proclaimed queen, a self-determined and self-made artist. She’s one of the boys, and she does it with the intent to subvert what it means. She sings about sexy women, about fucking around with different men. She raps about racing ahead in the game, imagines up her own strings of accolades, and rolls with a rap family notorious for dirty rhymes, foul mouths, and disregard for authority and hegemony.

While Beyoncé has expanded feminist discourse by reveling in her role as a mother and wife while also fighting for women’s rights, Minaj has been showing her teeth in her climb to the top of a male-dominated genre. Both, in the process, have expanded our society’s idea of what an empowered women looks like — but Minaj’s feminist credentials still frequently come under fire. To me, it seems like a clear-cut case of respectability politics and mainstreaming of the feminist movement: while feminist writers raved over Beyoncé’s latest album and the undertones of sexuality and empowerment that came with it, many have questioned Minaj’s decisions over the years to subvert beauty norms using her own body, graphically talk dirty in her work, and occasionally declare herself dominant in discourse about other women. (All of these areas of concern, however, didn’t seem to come into play when Queen Bey did the same.)

vouguez:

To tell a woman everything she may not do is to tell her what she can do. 

vouguez:

To tell a woman everything she may not do is to tell her what she can do. 

sexy-fruit:

THIS
see, the thing about threading
and waxing
and 100 squat challenges, is -
we are taught to suffer for good things,
to work ourselves thin,
discomfort is temporary and the rewards worth it;
we are taught to defy our instincts,
we are taught not to flinch
when something burns our skin;
to stay perfectly still,
until we are perfectly pretty;
pain is how you know you’re alive;
sore is the new sexy.
m.v., why doesn’t she just leave him.  (via findingwordsforthoughts)